The Combat of Görlitz (or Moys), 7th September 1757: A Scenario for ‘Tricorn’

We recently played another playtest of my ‘Tricorn’ Seven Years War variant for ‘Shako’ rules.  The after-action report will be up soon, along with the finalised version of ‘Tricorn’, but for the time being here’s my scenario for the Combat of Görlitz (also known as the Combat of Moys).

This is an average-sized scenario for 2-4 players and can happily be played in a single day.  This is definitely a good battle for getting all of your Grenadiers and Grenzers out of the box! 🙂

Historical Background

Following King Frederick‘s defeat at Kolin on 18th June 1757, the Prussians were forced to break off their siege of Prague and retreat into northern Bohemia.  By mid-July, their attempts to hold Bohemia had failed and the Prussians were forced to retreat further, through the mountains, into Lusatia.  Frederick tried and failed to bring the Austrians to battle, but instead lost the fortresses of Gabel and Zittau.

Bevern

Then in August, a new crisis emerged for Frederick, with the news that a Franco-Imperial army had invaded Saxony.  Assessing the French to be the greatest threat, Frederick departed for Saxony with the core of his army on 25th August, leaving the troops remaining in Lusatia under the command of the Duke of Brunswick-Bevern (often known simply as ‘Bevern’), with orders to prevent the Austrians from invading the key province of Silesia.

Bevern placed the core of his vastly-outnumbered army around the fortress of Görlitz, though thankfully for him the Austrians were hesitant to invade in full force until they were sure of Frederick’s movements in Saxony. 

Nádasdy

However, an Austrian observation corps, commanded by the Hungarian General of Cavalry Franz Leopold von Nádasdy, had discovered the Prussian corps of Generallieutenant Hans Karl von Winterfeldt. The Prussians were camped opposite Görlitz on the eastern bank of the River Neisse, isolated from the rest of Bevern’s army and ripe for plucking!

On hearing these reports, the army commander, Prince Charles of Lorraine ordered Nádasdy to attack Winterfeldt’s corps.  However, Nádasdy only had five regular infantry battalions, ten grenadier companies, 3,000 hussars and 8,000 Grenzer at his disposal, so Lorraine sent Colloredo’s Reserve Corps (temporarily under the command of the Duke d’Arenberg), consisting of a further 21 infantry battalions, 32 grenadier companies and 16 heavy guns, as well as Nostitz’s cavalry division, consisting of three regiments of Saxon chevauxlégers and two regiments of Austrian dragoons.  Further reinforcements would also be sent by Lorraine once the battle was underway.

Winterfeldt

On the other side of the lines, Winterfeldt had fifteen infantry battalions (seven of them grenadiers), three dragoon regiments (one of them being double-sized), one cuirassier regiment, two large hussar regiments and only a few heavy guns, so was badly outnumbered.  However, his forward outpost was the fortified hill of the Jäckelsberg, held by two of his grenadier battalions and a battery of heavy artillery.  A third grenadier battalion had fortified the village of Ober-Moys.  These would be tough nuts for the Austrians to crack.

The Duke of Bevern, following a personal reconnaissance, suspected that something was afoot on Winterfeldt’s front and sent word that he should place his forces on alert.  However, at 1100hrs when the Austrian heavy guns opened fire on the Jäckelsberg Redoubt, the defending ‘Beneckendorff’ and ‘Dieringshofen’ Grenadier Battalions were still cooking their breakfast and were almost completely surprised!  D’Arenberg’s seven Austrian grenadier battalions and a number of Grenzer battalions from Rudolf Pálffy’s column were already at the foot of the hill and immediately launched their assault. 

D’Arenberg

Despite the best efforts of Prince Carl von Bevern (not to be confused with Duke August Wilhelm the army commander) to organise a defence, the Prussian grenadiers were soon ejected from the Jäckelsberg, even carrying away the ‘Anhalt’ Grenadier Battalion, which was moving up in support!  Pálffy’s Grenzer also manage to capture the lower portion of Moys and to make matters even worse, the ‘Nádasdy’ Hussars crossed over the stream and badly cut up the fleeing survivors.

Winterfeldt moved forward with Kannacher’s Brigade, namely the four musketeer battalions stationed on the right wing; those of the ‘Manteuffel’ and ‘Tresckow’ Regiments.  The three fleeing grenadier battalions rallied as soon as they saw the approaching reinforcements and turned on their pursuers.  However, tragedy then struck as Winterfeldt, discussing the situation with Prince Carl, was struck and mortally wounded by an enemy bullet!  Winterfeldt, long a favourite of the King and probably one of Prussia’s best generals, would die of his wounds the following day.

Immediately assuming command, Prince Carl ordered Kannacher and the three grenadier battalions to make an immediate counter-attack on the Jäckelsberg.  the counter-attack initially went well, driving the Austrians back through the burning Prussian camp, to the very top of the entrenchments.  However, Clerici’s Austrian division had reached the spot first and a bitter, confused battle for possession of the entrenchments now developed among the burning tents.  During this fight, two Austrian regiments even fired upon each other, while large numbers of the Prussian ‘Tresckow’ Regiment, being of unenthusiastic Silesian Catholic stock, used the smoke and confusion as an opportunity to desert. 

Pálffy

To make matters even worse for the Prussians, a confused ADC with orders for the ‘Manteuffel’ Infantry Regiment, mistakenly delivered orders to the ‘Manteuffel’ Grenadier Battalion in Ober-Moys!  Obeying those orders to the letter, the grenadiers immediately abandoned Ober-Moys to join the battle for the redoubt!  The vacated strongpoint was immediately occupied by Grenzer and with the flank-guard gone, Pálffy’s Grenzer and Hussars moved forward once again to threaten the Prussian right flank.

Seeing the situation deteriorate and fearing a stronger Austrian attack on the right bank of the Neisse, the Duke of Bevern dispatched three battalions from the Görlitz garrison (the ‘Kahlden’ & ‘Schenckendorff’ Grenadier Battalions and the 1st Battalion of the ‘Schulze’ Infantry Regiment) to reinforce Winterfeldt’s corps

After an hour of bitter combat, with more fresh Austrian battalions arriving and with their position enfiladed by artillery, the exhausted Prussians pulled back, abandoning the redoubt to the enemy.  Meeting the three fresh battalions coming from Görlitz, the retreating Prussian infantry turned once again and formed up on the right of the main Prussian position, halting their pursuers.

Zieten

Over on the Prussian left wing, the legendary hussar Hans Joachim von Zieten had assumed command and was able to stop the Austrian advance in that sector with the threat of his massed cavalry and some heavy guns emplaced on the Langberg ridge. 

Petazzi’s Grenzer were making a nuisance of themselves on the left flank, so Kleist was ordered to clear them out of Leopoldshayn and throw them back across the river.  However, Kleist’s two grenadier battalions (‘Unruh’ and ‘Hacke’) were unable to make any headway against the superior Grenzer firepower and after a fruitless firefight lasting an hour, were forced to pull back.  Thankfully for the Prussians, Petazzi made no serious effort to attack the Prussian left flank with his three hussar regiments.

Lorraine

As the fighting petered out in mid-afternoon, the cautious Prince Charles of Lorraine, fearing a Prussian counter-attack in that sector, sent even more reserves over to Nádasdy, including a further 22 grenadier companies eight horse grenadier companies.  The grenadier companies under Sprecher took over responsibility for the Jäckelseberg, relieving D’Arenberg’s surviving grenadiers, who were now returned to their duties in the rear (surprising as it may seem, Austrian grenadier companies were normally employed as camp, baggage and headquarters guards).  These were further reinforced later in the afternoon by an additional 31 grenadier companies.

Frederick II

The Combat of Görlitz (or Moys) can therefore be considered an Austrian victory, as they succeeded in ejecting the Prussians from the key Jäckelsberg fortification and inflicted significant losses on the defenders.  However, the battle achieved nothing in strategic terms and it was unconnected supply problems that eventually forced Bevern to retreat from Görlitz.  The most significant impact of the battle was that on King Frederick personally.  With the death of Winterfeldt he had lost not only one of his most gifted generals but also his dearest friend, who he later described in a letter to his sister as the “man of my soul, my friend”.  

Prussian Order of Battle

The Prussian Corps of Generallieutenant Hans Karl von Winterfeldt

(2 Aides de Camp)

Advanced Posts of the Right Wing – Prince Carl von Bevern
Grenadier Battalion ‘Manteuffel’ (37/40) – in Moys – 12 Figs [5/2]
III. Standing Grenadier Battalion ‘Beneckendorff’ (41/44) – in Jäckelsberg Redoubt – 12 Figs [5/2]
Grenadier Battalion ‘Dieringshofen’ (21/27) – in Jäckelsberg Redoubt – 12 Figs [5/2]
Heavy Foot Battery – in Jäckelsberg Redoubt

Flank-Guard of the Right Wing – Kursell
Grenadier Battalion ‘Kleist’ (15/18) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Grenadier Battalion ‘Anhalt’ (24/34) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Battalion Guns

Cavalry of the Right Wing – ? 
I. Bn/(Leib) Hussar Regiment ‘Zieten'(HR2) (elite) – 12 Figs [5/2]
II. Bn/(Leib) Hussar Regiment ‘Zieten’ (HR2) (elite) – 12 Figs [5/2]

Infantry of the Centre – Wied
I. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Manteuffel’ (IR17) (elite) – 12 Figs [5/2]
II. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Manteuffel’ (IR17) (elite) – 12 Figs [5/2]
I. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Tresckow’ (IR32) (unreliable) – 12 Figs [3/0]
II. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Tresckow’ (IR32) (unreliable) – 12 Figs [3/0]
I. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Lestwitz’ (IR31) – 12 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Lestwitz’ (IR31) – 12 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Pannewitz’ (IR10) – 12 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Pannewitz’ (IR10) – 12 Figs [4/1]
Battalion Guns
Battalion Guns
Heavy Foot Battery

Cavalry of the Left Wing – Zieten
I. Bn/Dragoon Regiment ‘Brandenburg’ (DR5) – 16 Figs [5/2]
II. Bn/Dragoon Regiment ‘Brandenburg’ (DR5) – 16 Figs [5/2]
Cuirassier Regiment ‘Baron von Schönaich’ (CR6) – 16 Figs [6/2]
Dragoon Regiment ‘Normann’ (DR1) – 16 Figs [5/2]
Dragoon Regiment ‘Württemberg’ (DR12) – 16 Figs [5/2]

Flank-Guard of the Left Wing – Kleist
I. Bn/(Braun) Hussar Regiment ‘Werner’ (HR6) – 12 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/(Braun) Hussar Regiment ‘Werner’ (HR6) – 12 Figs [4/1]
II. Standing Grenadier Battalion ‘Unruh’ (45/48/gIX) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Grenadier Battalion ‘Hacke’ (3/6) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Battalion Guns

Reinforcement Column – ?
I. Standing Grenadier Battalion ‘Kahlden’ (gNG/g3/g4) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Grenadier Battalion ‘Schenckendorff’ (35/36) – 12 Figs [5/2]
I. Bn/Musketeer Regiment ‘Schulze’ (IR29) (elite) – 12 Figs [5/2]
Battalion Guns

Prussian Breakpoints

Each division must check when it’s losses reach the number of morale points shown below.  The values represent the total Frontal Morale Rating (FMR) of the division in brackets, followed by the divisional test-points of one third, half and three-quarters:

Bevern (15) – 5/8/13
Kursell (10) – 4/5/8
Right Wing Cavalry (10) – 4/5/8
Wied (32) – 11/16/24
Zieten (26) – 9/13/20
Kleist (18) – 6/9/14
Reinforcement Column (15) – 5/8/13

Likewise, the army must check when its losses (in terms of completely broken divisions) reach the levels shown below.  The total FMR level of the army is shown in brackets, followed by the test-points for one-quarter, one-third and half losses:

Prussian Army – Winterfeldt (141) – 36/47/71

Prussian Notes

1. Units marked on their label with a * (namely the ‘Manteuffel’ Musketeers, ‘Schulze’ Musketeers and ‘Zieten’ (Leib) Hussars) are classed as elite and rate one MR level higher than normal.

2. Units marked on their label with a † (namely the ‘Tresckow’ Musketeers) are classed as unreliable and rate one MR lower than normal.

3. The reinforcement column will arrive on the turn following the first withdrawal of a unit from the Jäckelsberg Redoubt. They will arrive in a single column on the Görlitz Road (i.e. at the bottom-left corner of the map), march 12 inches onto the table, adopt any formation and then go onto Reserve orders.

4. The heavy battery in the Jäckelsberg Redoubt is unlimbered. All other batteries may start the game limbered or unlimbered.

5. The 2nd ‘Zieten’ (Leib) Hussars were initially a part of Kursell’s right flank-guard, but Zieten ordered them to come across to the centre when the Austrian army appeared. They could alternatively be left on the right flank under Kursell’s command, in which case Kursell’s total strength would be 20 and the breakpoints would be 7/10/15.

6. Prussian regiments during this period were known by the name of their regimental Chef or a historic title.  Independent battalions were known by the name of their commanding officer.  However, units are often referred to in histories by their 1806 regimental numbers (usually as it makes maps easier to label and regiments with frequently-changing titles easy to track through history).  I’ve included the anachronistic unit numbers, as it also makes units easier to label on the table.

7. Units with 16 figures are classed as Large Units and can absorb an extra hit.

8. The infantry regiments are listed in their deployment order from right to left.  The division may alternatively be split in two wings; the right wing, consisting of the ‘Manteuffel’ and ‘Tresckow’ Regiments under Kannacher and the left wing, consisting of the ‘Lestwitz’ and ‘Pannewitz’ Regiments under Wied.  Both wings will then have a total MR of 16 and breakpoints of 6/8/12.

9.  Prince Carl von Bevern’s division starts the game on Defend orders.  All other divisions may be given any orders.

Austrian Order of Battle

The Austrian Corps of General of Cavalry Franz Leopold von Nádasdy auf Fogaras

(2 Aides de Camp)

Light Troops of the Left Wing – Pálffy
I. Bn/Warasdiner St. Georger Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
Det./Slavonischer-Broder Grenzer – Skirmishers
I. Bn/1st Banal Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
II. Bn/1st Banal Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
Hussar Regiment ‘Nádasdy’ (HR11) – 12 Figs [4/1]
Combined Grenze Hussar Squadrons – 12 Figs [4/1]

Light Troops of the Right Wing – Petazzi
I. Bn/Karlstädter-Lykaner Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
II Bn./Karlstädter-Lykaner Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
I. Bn/Warasdiner-Creutzer Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
II. Bn/Warasdiner-Creutzer Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
I. Bn/Slavonischer-Gradiscaner Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
II Bn./Slavonischer-Gradiscaner Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
I Bn./Karlstädter-Oguliner Grenzer – 12 Figs [3/0]
Hussar Regiment ‘Kaiser Franz I’ (HR2) – 12 Figs [4/1]
Hussar Regiment ‘Kálnoky’ (HR17) – 12 Figs [4/1]
Hussar Regiment ‘Desewffy’ (HR34) – 12 Figs [4/1]

Cavalry of the Right Wing – Nostitz
Saxon Chevauxleger Regiment ‘Prinz Karl’ – 12 Figs [5/2]
Saxon Chevauxleger Regiment ‘Prinz Albrecht’ – 12 Figs [5/2]
Saxon Chevauxleger Regiment ‘Graf Brühl’ – 12 Figs [5/2]
Dragoon Regiment ‘Sachsen-Götha’ (DR28) – 16 Figs [5/2]
Dragoon Regiment ‘Jung-Modena’ (DR13) – 16 Figs [5/2]

Infantry of the Right Wing – Wied
I. Bn/ Infantry Regiment ’Los Rios’ (IR9) (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/ Infantry Regiment ’Mercy-Argentau’ (IR56) (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Hungarian Infantry Regiment ’Gyulai’ (IR51) (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Salm’ (IR14) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Alt-Colloredo’ (IR20) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Sprecher’ (IR22) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Salm’ (IR14) (3rd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Alt-Colloredo’ (IR20) (3rd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Hungarian Infantry Regiment ’Haller’ (IR31) (3rd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
Battalion Guns
Battalion Guns

Infantry of the Centre – Esterházy
I. Bn/Imperial Infantry Regiment ‘Mainz-Lamberg’ (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’D’Arberg’ (IR55) (1st Line) – 16 figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Jung-Colloredo’ (IR40) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Wied’ (IR28) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Jung-Colloredo’ (IR40) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Wied’ (IR28) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
Battalion Guns
Battalion Guns

Infantry of the Left Wing – Clerici
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Platz’ (IR43) (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’De Ligne’ (IR38) (1st Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
II. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Platz’ (IR43) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Königsegg’ (IR16) (2nd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Andlau’ (IR57) (3rd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Sachsen-Götha’ (IR30) (3rd Line) – 16 Figs [4/1]
Battalion Guns
Battalion Guns

Infantry of the Fourth Line – Forgách
I. Bn/Hungarian Infantry Regiment ’Batthyányi’ (IR34) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Hungarian Infantry Regiment ’Forgách’ (IR32) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Hungarian Infantry Regiment ’Leopold Pálffy’ (IR19) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Macquire’ (IR46) – 16 Figs [4/1]
I. Bn/Infantry Regiment ’Bayreuth’ (IR41) – 16 Figs [4/1]
Battalion Guns

Grenadier Corps – D’Arenberg
1st Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
2nd Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
3rd Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
4th Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
5th Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
6th Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]
7th Combined Grenadier Battalion – 12 Figs [5/2]

Artillery Reserve
Heavy Foot Battery (on the Galgenberg)
Heavy Foot Battery (on the Galgenberg)
Heavy Foot Battery (on the Buschberg)

Austrian Breakpoints

Each division must check when it’s losses reach the number of morale points shown below.  The values represent the total Frontal Morale Rating (FMR) of the division in brackets, followed by the divisional test-points of one third, half and three-quarters:

Pálffy (17) – 6/9/13
Petazzi (33) – 11/17/25
Nostitz (25) – 9/13/19
Wied (36) – 12/18/27
Esterházy (24) – 8/12/18
Clerici (24) – 8/12/18
Forgách (20) – 7/10/15
D’Arenberg (35) – 12/18/27

Likewise, the army must check when its losses (in terms of completely broken divisions) reach the levels shown below.  The total FMR level of the army is shown in brackets, followed by the test-points for one-quarter, one-third and half losses:

Austrian Army – Nádasdy (214) – 54/71/107

Austrian Notes

1. D’Arenberg’s Grenadier Corps has been formed from detached grenadier companies specifically in order to take the Jäckelsberg Redoubt.  The composition of the seven grenadier battalions is unknown, so I’ve arbitrarily numbered them 1-7.  Unlike Prussian grenadier battalions, which were permanently established for the duration of a war, Austrian grenadier battalions were ad hoc units created from whatever grenadier companies were available on a given day.

2. D’Arenberg’s Grenadier Corps starts the game no more than two moves from the Jäckelsberg Redoubt on enforced Attack orders and must directly attack the Jäckelsberg Redoubt.  It must continue to attempt to attack the redoubt until it has either been destroyed or the redoubt has been cleared of all Prussian units.  It will then adopt Defend orders on the Jäckelsberg and may not move to, or be used to attack or defend any other location.

3.  All other formations on table at the start of the game may be given any orders by the Austrian commander.

4. Forgách’s Fourth Line will arrive on the table at the start of the turn following the first morale test failure by one of the infantry or grenadier divisions (not the light troops or cavalry). They will arrive in a single line formation, directly in rear of the first three lines, will march to the Galgenberg and will then go onto Reserve orders.

5. Grenzer battalions may be split into two skirmisher stands before the start of the game, at the player’s choice.  The division loses 3 Morale points either when one formed battalion or two skirmisher stands have been lost (NB Pálffy’s division starts with an extra skirmisher stand, so can ignore the first skirmisher loss).  Grenzer battalions may not be split or re-combined once the game has started.

6. The heavy batteries on the Buschberg and the Galgenberg start the game already unlimbered. All other batteries may start the game limbered or unlimbered. 

7. Austrian and Saxon regiments during this period were known by the name of their regimental Inhaber.  However, units are often referred to in histories by their 1769 regimental numbers (usually as it makes maps easier to label and regiments with frequently-changing titles easy to track through history).  I’ve included the anachronistic unit numbers, as it also makes units easier to label on the table.

8. Units with 16 figures are classed as Large Units and can absorb an extra hit.

9. The ‘Mainz-Lamberg’ Infantry Regiment (also known simply as ‘Mainz’) was an Imperial auxiliary unit supplied to the Austrian Army by the Elector-Archbishop of Mainz.  Not to be confused with the ‘Mainz’ Infantry Regiment of the Imperial Reichsarmee, this was an excellent regiment, organised along Austrian lines and absolutely their equal.  They were uniformed along Austrian lines, in white coats and waistcoats, straw breeches, dark blue facings and white ‘metal’.  Flags are unknown.  I really must get around to painting these…

10. Early in the afternoon, Prince Charles of Lorraine sent a further 22 grenadier companies (equating to roughly four battalions) to relieve d’Arenberg on the Jäckelseberg, to guard against the possibility of a Prussian counter-attack.  This was followed later in the afternoon by 8 companies of horse grenadiers and then another 31 companies (roughly six battalions) of grenadiers.  However, as none of these troops took part in the fighting, I’ve left them out of the scenario.

Terrain Notes

Here is the terrain map with the troop formations removed. 

Both streams are bordered by a strip of woodland, with larger areas of woodland on the Birken-Busch, the Weinberg and between the Jäckelsberg and the river.

The western stream passing through Moys (known as the Rothwasser) is passable as per the standard rules, though there are two bridges at Moys which may be passed in column.  The eastern stream passing through Hermsdorf and Leopoldshayn is impassable except at the two bridges marked.

The Jäckelsberg Redoubt and the fortified village of Ober-Moys have a defensive modifier of +2.  There is no additional +1 modifier for the slope of the Jäckelsberg.  All other villages have a +1 defensive modifier.

All slopes are classed as gentle for movement purposes, though provide a +1 defensive modifier.

Game Length & Objectives

Establishing victory conditions for this battle is somewhat tricky, as the Austrians vastly outnumber the Prussians and with the benefit of hindsight, won’t have the same degree of caution or fear of a Prussian counter-attack by unseen (and non-existent) bodies of troops.  We therefore decided to put an arbitrary time-limit of 12 turns and that seemed to work, though could be extended to 16 turns, as it’s a long march from the Austrian start-line to the Prussian Langeberg position and 16 turns would allow more time for combat once the Austrians get there.

Victory will be awarded if one side breaks the other army OR if one side controls the Jäckelsberg at the end of the game.

The Prussians can maintain their honour if they still control the Langeberg AND have inflicted more casualties than they have received.

Yeah, it’s a bit vague and woolly, but so was the actual battle.  Feel free to make up your own victory conditions. 😉

Anyway, that’s it for now.  The After-Action Report will follow soon, along with the rules conversion notes and Quick-Reference Sheets for ‘Tricorn’.

This entry was posted in 15mm Figures, Eighteenth Century, Scenarios, Seven Years War & War of Austrian Succession, Shako Rules, Tricorn (18th Century Shako Rules). Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Combat of Görlitz (or Moys), 7th September 1757: A Scenario for ‘Tricorn’

  1. Pingback: The Combat of Görlitz (or Moys), 7th September 1757: The Refight | Jemima Fawr's Miniature Wargames Blog

  2. Paul Petri says:

    I stumbled across your blog over on The Lead Adventure site. I was shocked to see you are using Shako to fight the SYW as I just started doing the same thing myself about two months ago. I have had one practice game, you can see it here if you like.
    http://bennosfiguresforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=177&t=25265
    I am very interested to see your rules when you get them up on your site. Tomorrow, the 22nd, five of us are going to try my ideas out again. If you have any interest at all I can email you my PDFs I have made of my rule ideas. Just a QRS and some thoughts on deployment rules mostly stolen from Tactica also by Arty.

    • jemima_fawr says:

      Thanks Pau! I’m going to have a look at your blog now. 🙂

      Yes, we played ‘Tricorn’ to death back in the 90s, including a massive campaign, but perhaps had ‘too much of a good thing’ at the time and didn’t play it again for nearly 25 years!

      Sorry for the protracted wait for my rules…

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